SAJ

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SAJ 15/1 (2023): Call For Papers

Architectural Indentities: Japan

Guest Editor:  PhD Ivan Filipović (Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, Serbia)

Papers due: 31 October 2022

*If you prefer reading offline, please note that you can download Call for Papers in pdf.

Architectural identities and their projection and interpretation can be viewed as multi-layered and multi-faceted occurrences. The study and interpretation of identities in architecture is infinitely complex and multifaceted, for which the investigation of the Japanese identity(-ies) and its spatial manifestations is a most elucidating venture. Every identity embodies a part of the cultural denotation system, simultaneously representing the social life and categories of social politics (Ignjatović, 2007).

Identity is constructed with specific cultural contents and symbols, but always in relation to a specific context. Sociological theories, among other postulations, insist on identity as a process, rather than a condition, emphasizing the importance of collective self-identification and identification of others through the system of culture as a “grammar of social life” (Golubović, 1999).

When it comes to examining the case of Japan (including the spatial realm), it is constructed through its differentiation from Others, who are alternately understood as inferior or superior to Japan. There are various ways of relating to difference, including comparison and integration. The notion of the duality of the scholastically upheld concept of Nihonjinron (the question of Japan(ese)-ness) argues that there is Nihonjinron by Japanese and Nihonjinron by foreigners (Befu, 2001). In a broader sense, cultural identity is argued as being socially and ideologically constructed rather than belonging to some kind of independent, authentic, or arbitrary culture (Koković, 2002).

While discussing the mechanisms of propagation of the Nihonjinron ideology, Yoshino (1999) noted how “[…] ideological manipulations may have occurred between certain sections of the population”. Although the conclusion is that: “Cultural nationalism in contemporary nationalism cannot adequately be explained in terms of ideological manipulations alone” (ibid), it is important to question the roles of architects in the disseminations of the narratives of cultural nationalism (e.g. Isozaki, 2006).

The link between architecture and ideology is situated in the attempt to identify relation between the ideological positions, values, social practices, and architectural concepts that materialize and represent them through the specific architectural space, ideology, and representation (Vasiljević Tomić et al. 2013).

This thematic issue of the SAJ focuses on the relationship between architectural design and the theory of (Japanese) identity(-ies). An additional goal is to review and examine theoretical and practical aspects utilized in construction and/or confirmation of a desired identity within the broader context of contemporary architectural practice. The question remains: How does architecture, within practice and theory, interpret and conceptualize tangible spaces of identity (with or without ideological implications)?

The contributing authors are encouraged to interpret these issues and inspire future scholastic research in an age where it is increasingly important to raise (self-) awareness of the use of identities, particularly in the field of architecture and the built environment.

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.

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Befu, H. (2001). Hegemony of Homogeneity: An Anthropological Analysis of Nihonjinron. Trans Pacific Press.
Golubović, Z. (1999). Ja i drugi. Antropološka istraživanja individualnog i kolektivnog identiteta [I and others. Anthropological investigations of
individual and collective identity]. Republika.
Ignjatović, A. (2007). Jugoslovenstvo u arhitekturi 1904-1941 [Yugoslav in Architecture 1904-1941].Građevinska knjiga
Isozaki, A., Stewart, D. B., Kohso, S., & Mori, T. (2006). Japan-ness in Architecture (First Edition). The MIT Press.
Koković, D. (2002) Integration processes, regionalism and keeping of cultural identity. Sociološki pregled, Vol. 36, No. 1-2, pp. 163-171.
Vasiljević Tomić, D., Nikezić, A., & Ćirić, D. (2013). Negotiating cultural identity through the architectural representation case study: Foreign embassy
in Belgrade. Facta Universitatis – Series: Architecture and Civil Engineering, 11(2), 113–124.
Yoshino, K. (1999). Consuming Ethnicity and Nationalism: Asian Experiences. University of Hawai’i Press

SAJ 14/3 (2022): Call For Papers

'Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought' - Henri Bergson

Guest Editors: Dr Michel Melenhorst (Detmold School of Architecture and Interior Architecture – University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Germany); Eric de Leeuw (ArtEZ University of the Arts, Netherlands) 

Papers due: 30 September 2022

*If you prefer reading offline, please note that you can download Call for Papers in pdf.

The most architectural thing about this building is the state of decay in which it is. Architecture only survives where it negates the form society expects of it. Where it negates itself by transgressing the limits that history has set for it.’ – Bernard Tschumi

These lines Bernard Tschumi wrote in one of his advertisements for architecture. The advertisement showed an image of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoy in an advanced state of decay. Each of the adds, published in the 1970s, was a manifesto of sorts, confronting the dissociation between the immediacy of spatial experience and the analytical definition of theoretical concepts.

 

In our time of climate change and circular concepts, the reuse of buildings plays an increasingly important role. The contemporary reuse method seems spatially conservative in most cases, often dialectical in its juxtaposition of old and new, and neglects the opportunity to think of an architecture that goes beyond the edge of known space concepts. 

 

We would like to argue that Tschumi’s transgression-methods can help us think beyond this re-use in a traditional manner. What if we cross the boundaries of thinking and acting? What are the speculative, artistic outcomes we don’t see yet? An active, contextual, performative, intervening design strategy, working with and in existing space, especially in reuse design, could offer the possibility of overcoming the impossibility of linking concept and spatial experience. Not a thought transgression but an acting transgression. So, which boundaries are there to cross? 

 

Topics of interest for this issue include, but are not limited, to the areas: 

 

Transgression in:
– design
– innovative design methodologies
– architects education methodologies
– tools for architecture
– body and space
 
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Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.

SAJ 14/2 (2022): Call For Papers

'Technology is the answer. But what is the question?' - Cedric Price

Guest Editor: Jelena Milošević (Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade)

Papers due: 31 July 2022

*If you prefer reading offline, please note that you can download Call for Papers in pdf.

‘Technology is the answer. But what is the question?’ – Cedric Price

Since architect Cedric Price (1934-2003) posed this provocative question to the audience during a lecture in 1966, researchers and professionals, above all in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry, have attempted to rethink our technology on numerous occasions. The SAJ thematic issue aims to reply to this challenge that remains pertinent owing to technological change (TC) by synthesizing artistic, theoretical, and technological positions. Authors are invited to continue the discussion on the more intelligent use of technology in building design, construction, operation, and assessment by questioning how it affects the future of societies and the environment. Topics of interest for this issue include but are not limited to technologically based practice, research, and education in the AEC industry, ranging from the methods and tools that enable the creation, simulation, and materialization to new ways of approaching the built-unbuilt environment relationship. 

Contributions may provide perspectives on architectural production in a creative setting where technology supports collaboration between scientists, artists, and designers, as well as human-machine collaboration or new methods of interacting with nature. Also, subjects of interest are insights into the most impactful application areas in the AEC field for diverse emerging and growing technologies (including computational algorithms, artificial intelligence (AI), simulations, digital fabrication, extended reality (XR)) as they increasingly transit from experimentation to practical implementation. The efficiency of these technologies as creative forces, predictive mechanisms, design and craftsmanship tools, educational aids, or vehicles to understand and direct resource flow and fully explore the circular potential of the built environment could also be evaluated in terms of help they could provide for us to move beyond current exploitative and destructive models towards a symbiotic regenerative approach and healthy environments of cohabitation in the Anthropocene.

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.

SAJ 14/1 (2022): Call For Papers

The Modern Cult of the Metaverse: Virtual Values and the Inevitable Decay of Heritage

Guest Editor: Anthony Brand (School of Architecture and Planning, University of Auckland, New Zealand)

Papers due: 15 May 2022

*If you prefer reading offline, please note that you can download Call for Papers in pdf.

‘Permanent preservation is not possible because natural forces are ultimately more powerful than all the wit of man, and man himself is destined to inevitable decay.’ – A. Riegl

In his essay ‘The Modern Cult of Monuments: Its Character and Origin’ (1903), Alois Riegl unpacks the notion of heritage (why something has significance for us). Accordingly, physical artefacts and built heritage have a tangible and empathetic significance for us – we touch and are touched by their presence – and like us they too exhibit ‘symptoms of decay’ that affords us a sense of unity in our shared mortality. 

This work had a direct influence on both the Athens Charter (1931) and the Venice Charter (1964) employed by The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) as setting a fundamental framework for a global approach to build heritage as our cultural legacy. These heritage values are predicated on a combination of qualitative and quantitative characteristics such age, narrative history, and authenticity. 

But Riegl also recognised that ‘in the near future’ the ‘development of modern techniques of reproduction’ would have significant consequences for how we perceive and experience both the original and the artificial artefact.

Writing over a century ago that near future has quickly become a recent past, and today we live in a time when smartphones are equipped with Lidar scanners, when AR/VR/XR is no longer the stuff of science-fiction, and virtual environments can be created in the morning and inhabited in the afternoon. The time has come to re-evaluate the meaning of heritage in a digital world, and whether it can hold the same value for us as its physical counterpart.

Indeed, can there even be such a thing as heritage if our digital environments do not show symptoms of decay, if there is no provenience or authenticity to speak of? Can we ever really be touched, moved, or affected by a digital environment if we are never truly embodying that space? What gets lost in the translation from the tangible material world to an intangible immaterial one?

This thematic issue of the SAJ focuses on broad implications of the concept of built heritage within virtual environments (digital archaeology, gaming industry, film industry, etc.): simply put, does it exist and if so in what form? These concerns have recently been brought to the fore by the threat of the global pandemic and subsequent social distancing which has prompted the increase of video conferencing and social media as many of us sought new means and media to interact with each other and escape the confines of our physical boundaries. Coupled with the increase of more affordable VR technologies and the sizable investment from Meta (formally Facebook Inc.) in their acquisition of Oculus, VR could soon become not only a reality but our reality. This raises further questions: Does the past still have a future in these environments? What is the cultural significance of architecture in a virtual world? Can you ever truly have a digital heritage or is this an oxymoron? 

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.