SAJ

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SAJ 14/1 (2022): Call For Papers

The Modern Cult of the Metaverse: Virtual Values and the Inevitable Decay of Heritage

Guest Editor: Anthony Brand (School of Architecture and Planning, University of Auckland, New Zealand)

‘Permanent preservation is not possible because natural forces are ultimately more powerful than all the wit of man, and man himself is destined to inevitable decay.’ – A. Riegl

In his essay ‘The Modern Cult of Monuments: Its Character and Origin’ (1903), Alois Riegl unpacks the notion of heritage (why something has significance for us). Accordingly, physical artefacts and built heritage have a tangible and empathetic significance for us – we touch and are touched by their presence – and like us they too exhibit ‘symptoms of decay’ that affords us a sense of unity in our shared mortality. 

This work had a direct influence on both the Athens Charter (1931) and the Venice Charter (1964) employed by The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) as setting a fundamental framework for a global approach to build heritage as our cultural legacy. These heritage values are predicated on a combination of qualitative and quantitative characteristics such age, narrative history, and authenticity. 

But Riegl also recognised that ‘in the near future’ the ‘development of modern techniques of reproduction’ would have significant consequences for how we perceive and experience both the original and the artificial artefact.

Writing over a century ago that near future has quickly become a recent past, and today we live in a time when smartphones are equipped with Lidar scanners, when AR/VR/XR is no longer the stuff of science-fiction, and virtual environments can be created in the morning and inhabited in the afternoon. The time has come to re-evaluate the meaning of heritage in a digital world, and whether it can hold the same value for us as its physical counterpart.

Indeed, can there even be such a thing as heritage if our digital environments do not show symptoms of decay, if there is no provenience or authenticity to speak of? Can we ever really be touched, moved, or affected by a digital environment if we are never truly embodying that space? What gets lost in the translation from the tangible material world to an intangible immaterial one?

This thematic issue of the SAJ focuses on broad implications of the concept of built heritage within virtual environments (digital archaeology, gaming industry, film industry, etc.): simply put, does it exist and if so in what form? These concerns have recently been brought to the fore by the threat of the global pandemic and subsequent social distancing which has prompted the increase of video conferencing and social media as many of us sought new means and media to interact with each other and escape the confines of our physical boundaries. Coupled with the increase of more affordable VR technologies and the sizable investment from Meta (formally Facebook Inc.) in their acquisition of Oculus, VR could soon become not only a reality but our reality. This raises further questions: Does the past still have a future in these environments? What is the cultural significance of architecture in a virtual world? Can you ever truly have a digital heritage or is this an oxymoron? 

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.

SAJ 13/3 (2021): Call For Papers

New Spatial Grammar

Guest Editor: Ana Nikezić (University of Belgrade – Faculty of Architecture, Serbia)

Shelter and security make for the most essential of architecture’s functions. However, the ‘new normal’ which still informs everyday living across the globe, calls for reconsideration of what do shelter and security mean under the circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic. The measurements that various governments took implied that public architecture is the opposite polar of safety, posing a threat to general health, whereas domestic structures stood for places of security. Nevertheless, as lockdown strategies continued – for months at the time at some countries – homes transformed into spaces of confinement. The global Covid-19 crisis undeniably left lasting marks on global perception of the built environment, while the New Normal altered the way that individuals and communities live, work, and interact. This Thematic Issue of SAJ aims to offer a platform to advance present understanding of the evolving dynamics between the pandemic and architecture, synthesize the existing knowledge, discuss the lessons that can be learned, and explore strategies for transformative solutions towards more sustainable and resilient design strategies in the post-COVID era.

The Thematic Issues acknowledges the new challenges which Covid-19 places in front of architects and seeks for contributions – in the form of research articles, reviews, case reports, or short communications – which offer new insights into the future perspectives of architectural design in the aftermath of Covid-19. For example, will the notion of resilient design become essential trait of built environment of the future? How should housing, workplaces, public buildings, entertainment facilities, and other essential and non-essential typologies cater for the imperatives of Well-being and Public Health? Is it possible to develop an antivirus-enabled architectural paradigm to reduce the potential risks or stop the virus from spreading in public spaces? Period of lockdown has shown that prolonged confinement in closed spaces may have significant impact on physical and mental health of the individuals. How can architecture help alleviate the symptoms of depression and other issues that might occur under the circumstances of pandemic? Various studies have shown that even a short break in nature can reduce stress drastically – is it plausible that biophilic design might become a greater part of collective architectural thinking? Will personal health issues and public health policies become more of a design determinant in the future and what might resultant spaces be? Studies have associated poor housing with increased risk of depressive symptoms during lockdown. Built environment of the lower social strata tends to feature smaller living spaces, with poor views and scarce indoor quality. Among other topics related to issues of inequality, researchers are invited to revisit the minimal requirements of habitable spaces and discuss the mechanisms through which architecture can overcome endorsing of socio-spatial discrimination.

Topics of interest for this issue include, but are not limited, to the areas:

  • social, economic, and environmental impacts of the pandemic on architecture;
  • success and failure cases of pandemic control via architectural design;
  • pandemic-resilient architecture;
  • lessons learned from the pandemic;
  • short-, medium- and long-term implications of the pandemic for architecture;
  • new architectural paradigms and models in the post-COVID era;
  • sustainable and resilient recovery strategies;
  • Covid-19 and living space;
  • well-being and Public Health recommendations for a resilient, healthy, and sustainable architecture;
  • biophilic design;
  • architecture and inequality;
  • New Normal – New Spaces?

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.

SAJ 13/1-2 (2021): Call For Papers

Lessons from Experience and Perspectives for Education

Guest Editor: Ružica Bogdanović (Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering, University of Belgrade, Serbia)

Affecting various aspects of life around the world, the Covid-19 pandemic had significant impact on the field of higher education. Preventing face-to-face contact, the Covid-19 pandemic placed unprecedented challenges to conventional architectural teaching and learning. Building upon the Covid-19 experience and addressing the challenges in architectural education in a period of crisis, this Special Issue of SAJ aims to serve as a repository of relevant information, material, and knowledge to support future research, curriculum making, teaching, learning, and transferability of experiences. This Special Issue seeks contributions— in the form of research articles, reviews, case studies, critical perspectives, or short communications —offering insights into specific problems and practical solutions that architectural education encountered under the Covid-19 circumstances.

Researchers are encouraged to submit their work on topics, including, but not limited three wide sets of questions concerning architectural education during the Covid-19: content, teaching and learning processes, and institutional practices. For example, researchers are invited to discuss will the future see environment-behavior studies, discussions of public health, and biophilic design being brought from the margins of curriculum content more to the center? Various architecture schools have already started to introduce programs focused on “crisis architecture,” i.e. design responses to natural and man-made disasters, such as climate change, social conflicts, floods, or pandemics – what other changes to the curriculum content might occur? In terms of the teaching and learning processes, more of it might be carried out online. Schools could explore hybrid modes of teaching delivery. For example, lecture classes could be held online, while design studio might be hybrid. The Thematic Issue is especially interested in case studies based on specific education projects executed during the pandemics. Are there some new standards and protocols demonstrating how critical dialogue can be carried out online? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the on-line form of teaching and learning? Finally, researchers might submit contributions exploring new institutional practices that developed during the pandemic. For example, what were the consequences of decisions to support remote learning and teaching for institutional functioning? How were school leaders responding during COVID-19 and what forms of leadership practice are emerging? What was behavioral intention of faculty members towards the adoption of online teaching and assessment for architectural courses in the wake of Covid-19?

 Topics of interest for this issue include, but are not limited, to the areas:

  • social, economic, and environmental impacts of the pandemic on architectural education;
  • success and failure cases of architectural education during the Covid-19 pandemic;
  • pandemic-resilient architectural education;
  • lessons learned from the pandemic;
  • short-, medium- and long-term implications of the pandemic for architectural education;
  • new education paradigms and models in the post-COVID era;
  • remote architectural education and inequality;
  • New Normal – new curriculum content?

Though primarily focusing on the topics with the background in architecture, urbanism, and urban planning planning, the SAJ also welcomes interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research and submissions from various academic disciplines. To submit a paper, kindly go to our Author Guidelines page and follow the instructions provided. Alternatively, if you are familiar with SAJ publication process, you can submit your paper directly by clicking the button below. If you do not feel comfortable using the Assistant publishing platform, you can submit your paper by emailing the Editorial office directly at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs

For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial office at saj@arh.bg.ac.rs.